Thursday, May 19, 2016

Zardozi Embroidery Work of UttarPradesh India on Lehengas and Sarees ( Indian Bridal Wears )

Anyone who requires more information may contact Mala Chandrashekhar at the Email Id :  indianartsandcrafts2008@gmail.com

( Disclaimer : All images featured in this Blog-post, are the property of their respective owners. Our deepest sense of gratitude to all of them for making this gigantic project a reality. If you see your picture anywhere in this Blog and don't want it here, send us a message with the details and the link to the picture, and we will remove it right away. But at the outset, I just want to let my dearest readers know, that the noble purpose of this Blog, is to promote 'The Glorious Cultural Heritage of India' worldwide, to every nook & corner of the planet, and I would immensely love to see every single one of us, of Indian origin, passionately participating in this Mega-Project. I am right now in the process of adding the web-links to the sources of the innumerable images in this Blog. Till the work reaches completion, I would request the readers to use 'Google Image Search' to trace the source / multiple sources of these images on the web. So Long, Mala Chandrashekhar )


Article on Zardozi Embroidery underneath the pictures

Zardozi Bridal Saree : Source

Indian Zardozi Bridal Wear

Indian Zardozi Bridal Wear

Zardozi Bridal Wear


Zardozi embroidery is a form of beautiful metal embroidery, which once used to embellish the attire of the Kings and the royals in ancient and medieval India. Zardozi or Zar-douzi is an elaborate style of hand embroidery popular in Iran, India and Pakistan. This exquisite embroidery work was also used once to adorn walls of the royal tents, scabbards, wall hangings and the paraphernalia of regal elephants and horses in India. 

Zardozi embroidery work involves making elaborate designs, using gold and silver threads. Further adding to the magnificence of this work are the studded pearls and precious stones.

Zardozi embroidery has been in existence in India from the time of the Rig Veda. There are numerous instances in ancient India mentioning the use of Zari or 'Gold  and Silver Thread'  embroidery as ornamentation on the attires of Hindu gods. Initially, the embroidery was done with pure gold wires and real gold leaves. However, today, craftsmen make use of a combination of copper wire, with a golden or silver polish, and a silk thread, the reason being the rare availability of gold/silver on such large scales today as in olden days.

Main Centers of Zardozi embroidery in India are Lucknow, Bhopal, Hyderabad, Delhi, Agra, Kashmir, Mumbai, Ajmer and Chennai.


The word 'Zardozi' is made up of two Persian terms, Zar meaning gold and Dozi meaning embroidery. Zardozi attained its summit in India in the 17th century, under the patronage of Mughal Emperor Akbar. Under the rule of Aurangzeb, the royal patronage stopped and this led to the decline of the craft. Since the cost was high and raw materials quite rare, craftsmen could not carry on with the embroidery on their own.

Many brilliant craftsmen left Delhi and went to the royal courts of Rajasthan and Punjab in search of work. With the 18th and 19th century bringing industrialization, the craft suffered another setback. It was only after Indian independence in the year 1947 that the Indian government undertook measures to promote Zari embroidery and revive it once again.


Zardozi in India attained its fame and popularity through Mughal patronage.The Zardozi garments worn by the royal Begums of the Mughal courts were as priceless as they were exquisite.Those days pure gold was beaten into fine metal thread and this thread was used to embroider motifs on silk, satin and velvet fabric. This was further enhanced with the addition of precious gems such as diamonds, emeralds, and pearls and then sewn into the fabric as part of the embroidery.

Zardozi is a very ancient craft and one of the oldest forms of hand embroidery starting from Rig Vedic period in ancient India. Today, Zardozi is part of high fashion. One can see this form of exquisite embroidery in European fashion shows. It’s now exported to many countries from India.


Zardozi has also found its way these days into accessories like designer bangles, handbags and even shoes. We even see Zardozi
cushion covers and draperies these days.

But there is also a flip side. We often see fraudulent people trying to pass off machine embroidery as handmade Zardozi these days. This is a very disturbing trend.

Agra, Jaipur, Lucknow, Delhi, Banares and Bareilly are the hubs for original handmade Zardozi work, each place having its own style and own techniques.

The Zardozi products manufactured in areas like Lucknow and six surrounding districts of Barabanki, Unnao, Sitapur, Rae Bareli,
Hardoi and Amethi became a brand and now carry a registered logo to confirm their authenticity.



Friday, May 13, 2016

* Raksha Bandhan / Raakhi Poornima : A Beautiful Indian Festival For Celebrating Love Between Brothers and Sisters

( Disclaimer : All images featured in this Blog-post, are the property of their respective owners. Our deepest sense of gratitude to all of them for making this gigantic project a reality. If you see your picture anywhere in this Blog and don't want it here, send us a message with the details and the link to the picture, and we will remove it right away. But at the outset, I just want to let my dearest readers know, that the noble purpose of this Blog, is to promote 'The Glorious Cultural Heritage of India' worldwide, to every nook & corner of the planet, and I would immensely love to see every single one of us, of Indian origin, passionately participating in this Mega-Project. I am right now in the process of adding the web-links to the sources of the innumerable images in this Blog. Till the work reaches completion, I would request the readers to use 'Google Image Search' to trace the source / multiple sources of these images on the web. So Long, Mala Chandrashekhar )


A brief write-up on Raksha Bandhan / Raakhi Poornima underneath the following pictures

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image

Raksha Bandhan : Click Here For Source Of Image


Raksha Bandhan is also known as Raakhi Purnima or simply Rakhi in many parts of India.

It is a Hindu Festival which celebrates the love and duty between brothers and sisters. The festival is also popularly observed to celebrate any brother-sister relationship between boys and girls, between men and women who are neither relatives nor biologically related.
 

The festival is  celebrated by many Non-Hindu communities as well in India, as a secular festival.

On Raksha Bandhan, sisters tie a Sacred Thread / Raakhi on their brother's wrist. This symbolizes the sister's love and prayers for her brother's well-being, and the brother's lifelong vow to protect his sister come what may. The festival falls on the full moon day (पूर्णिमा ) (Shraavan Poornima श्रावण पूर्णिमा ) of the Shraavan Month of the Hindu calendar.

Raksha Bandhan as a religious festival focuses on performing an Aarti and saying the prayers prior to tying Raakhi / Sacred Thread. The prayers draw inspirations from the Hindu Scriptures. The other religious feature is the application of the Tilak on the forehead of the person wearing the Raakhi.

Raksha Bandhan in Indian Classical Language Sanskrit literally means "The Knot of Protection". The word Raksha means protection, while Bandhan is the word for knot. It is an ancient Hindu Festival that ritually celebrates the love and duty between brothers and their sisters. The sister performs a Raakhi ceremony, then prays to express her love and her good wishes for the well being of her brother. In return, the brother ritually pledges to protect and take care of his sister under all circumstances. Raksha Bandhan is one of the several occasions in which family ties are affirmed in India. The other occasions are Karva Chauth, Bhaai Dooj etc.

The festival is also an occasion to celebrate brother-sister like family ties between cousins or distant family members, and sometimes even between biologically unrelated men and women. To many, the festival transcends biological family, brings together men and women across various religions, diverse ethnic groups and ritually emphasizes harmony and immense love. It is observed in the Hindu calendar month of Śrāvaṇa, and typically falls in the month of August every year.
 

Days or weeks before Raksha Bandhan, women folks shop for Raakhi, the ceremonial thread to tie around their brother's wrist. Some women make their own Raakhi. A Raakhi may be a simple thread, woven and colourful, or a it may be an intricate thread with beautiful amulets and complex decorations on top of it. Sometimes, a Raakhi may even be a fancy wrist watch or men's wrist accessory in the form of bracelet or jewelery. Raakhi in the form of a simple colourful woven thread is most common. Typically the brother(s) too shop for gifts for their sisters, ahead of Raksha Bandhan. The gift from the brother can be a simple thoughtful token of love or may be more elaborate and grand.

On the morning of Raksha Bandhan, the brothers and sisters get together, often in nice dress in the presence of surviving parents, grandparents and other family members. If the sister and brother are geographically separated, the sister may mail the Rakhi ahead of the Raksha Bandhan day, along with a Greeting Card or Letter wishing her brother well. The ritual typically begins in front of a Lighted Oil Lamp (Diya) , which signifies Hindu Fire-Deity ( Agni).

Once the Rakhi has been tied, the sister says a prayer for the well being, good health, prosperity and happiness of her brother. This ritual  involves an Aarti, where a tray with lighted lamp is ritually rotated around the brother's face, along with the prayer and well wishes.

The prayer is a self composed note, or one of the many published Raakhi poems and proses. One of the earliest examples of a Raakhi prayer is found in Chapter V of Vishnu Purana; it is the prayer that Yashoda says while tying a Raksha Bandhan amulet on Krishna's wrist.